JULIA AURORA GUZMÁN

Artist's statement

Using a combination of materials such as metal, coral stone, wood, wax, mesh, and thread, compositions are constructed to settle between the material’s logic and mine. With the purpose of responding to ubiquitous support systems, found in architecture and institutional methods of display, I examine their labor and create sculptures and installations that re-contextualize those mechanisms. The object ‘displayed’, and the object that holds 'it' become sculptures that are made for each other, holding, supporting, revealing themselves in place. The work plays with scale and with the audience, igniting the imagination of spaces through the phenomenology of immensity while creating active, and conscious relationships between the human body, the architectural body and the sculptural body.  Their process juxtaposes rawness and refinement, and amorphous objects against calculated structures. Guided through the aesthetics of geometry and tensegrity, the work is conceptually and formally related through balance and precariousness.

 

Solo exhibition 2019: HOW TO HOLD

Holder of Open-endedness
Holder of Open-endedness

Holder of Open-endedness Inkjet print mounted on acrylic, metal, paint 35 x 18.5 cm edition of 3, regardless of size

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Pillar as Nest
Pillar as Nest

2019, 290 x 184 x 36 cm, unique, cement, plastic, marblecast, hydrocal, fiberglass, wax, fabric, mesh, thread

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Holder of Cycles
Holder of Cycles

Inkjet print mounted on acrylic, metal 35 x 18.5 cm edition of 3, regardless of size

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Absent in a Spiral
Absent in a Spiral

2017, Metal, Mahogany Wood, Coral Stone, 42” x 26.5” x 33.25”

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Calculated Arch in Display
Calculated Arch in Display

2017, Coral Stone, Mahogany Wood, Metal, Duracal, 19" x 4" x 4"

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How to Biography
How to Biography

2017, Fiberglass, Wax, Mesh, Thread, Metal, 38" x 26" x 4.5"

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How to Stand
How to Stand is a site-specific exhibition and installation which inhabits the gallery by architecturally and sculpturally intervening the space. It acknowledges the history and architecture of the Colonial Zone of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and it responds to certain architectural elements by creating sculptures that re-contextualize their original function and labor. Influenced by the language of systems of support, architecture, and museology, this exhibit highlights a relationship between human, architectural, and sculptural bodies. It is an exhibit that plays with scale and with its audience while igniting the imagination of spaces and movement beyond functional references.